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Friday, 29 May 2020


Belinda S. Goodrich, PMP, PgMP, PMI-SP, PMI-RMP, PMI-ACP, CAPM 

Project Management Professional (PMP) certification is the highest industry-recognized project management credential. The PMP recognizes individuals who have demonstrated competencies and experience in leading project initiatives. Along with documented experience and education, candidates for the PMP must pass a rigorous 200-question exam. 

Step 1: Evaluate Your Experience 

Evaluate your Experience

The first step toward obtaining your PMP certification is to evaluate your project management experience. That experience must be within the last eight years and within a professional context, meaning you were compensated for your work. Projects are considered temporary initiatives that create unique products, services, or results. If you have a four-year degree or higher, you will need to document 4,500 hours / 36 months of project experience. Without a four-year degree, the experience requirement increases to 7,500 hours / 60 months of project experience. You will also need 35 hours of project management education or a Certified Associate in Project Management (CAPM)® certification. 

Step 2: Submit Your Application 

Once you have confirmed that you meet all requirements, you can complete your application on the Project Management Institute (PMI) website. It is highly recommended that you have all your information gathered and handy when you start your application. The application will stay open for 90 days for you to enter the required information. After 90 days, it will close. 

Submit your Application

PMI will conduct an application review to verify that what you submitted on your application is appropriate and valid. The application process typically takes about five days, at which time you will be notified via email of the result. PMI may contact you for additional information during this time, or you may be selected for an audit. 

If you are selected for an audit, you will be instructed to provide proof of the work and education that you submitted on your application. Education audit requirements are fulfilled by supplying a copy of your training transcript, certificates of completion, or copies of your diploma. A supervisor or manager will be required to submit signed experience verification forms confirming that your experience is accurate. All audit materials must be submitted to PMI in a hard-copy format. 

Step 3: Schedule Your Exam 

Once your application is approved, you can pay your PMP exam fees. As of April 2020, the PMP exam fee is $405 for PMI members and $555 for non-PMI members. Your eligibility year begins on the day PMI approves your application. After your fees are paid, PMI will email you your eligibility ID, which is required to schedule your exam at a local Pearson VUE location. 

Schedule your Exam

Step 4: Complete Your Exam 

The four-hour PMP exam is administered by Pearson VUE and consists of 200 multiple-choice questions. Of the 200 questions, 25 are considered pretest, meaning they do not count against you if you miss them. However, there is no indication during the exam regarding which questions are pretest. 

Before beginning your exam, you will have 15 minutes during which you will take the test tutorial. After the tutorial, you can start your test. You will be given one question at a time and will have the option to answer the question, leave it blank, or answer it and mark it for review. After the last question, you will be provided with a review screen, indicating which questions you have answered and which have been left blank or marked for review. Be sure to answer all questions, as those left blank will count against you. 

When you have answered all questions, submit your exam. The testing system will evaluate your exam answers and return your pass or fail results. The exam proctor will provide you with a hard copy of your test results. In addition to the pass or fail, you will receive one of four proficiency ratings for each domain: above target, at target, below target, or needs improvement. If you do not pass your exam on the first try, you will have two additional attempts available within your eligibility year. 

Complete your Exam

If you are interested in PMP certification, EduMind can help you prepare for and pass your exam. With various course learning format options to choose from, you can find the one that works best for you. Click here to find out more. 

Project Management Professional (PMP)® and Certified Associate in Project Management (CAPM)® are registered trademarks of Project Management Institute, Inc.

EduMind Inc at 09:05

Thursday, 28 May 2020


Belinda S. Goodrich, PMP, PgMP, PMI-SP, PMI-RMP, PMI-ACP, CAPM 

If you are a project manager who has considered certification, you have likely heard horror stories about how difficult the exam is to pass. As certification and credentialing exams go, there is no doubt that the Project Management Professional (PMP) is one of the more difficult ones to attempt. But even getting approved to take the exam poses a challenge. 

To be approved to sit for the exam, candidates must demonstrate either three years (4,500 hours) of experience with a four-year degree or five years (7,500 hours) of experience without a four-year degree, plus experience leading and directing project activities. While the application simply asks for the description of the project work, approximately 25% of applicants are randomly selected for audit. Audited applications require further documentation of their experience. 

The PMP exam is based on A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide) and “other relevant sources,” which contribute to the difficulty of the exam. The PMBOK Guide is a large text with 49 processes that all have inputs, tools and techniques, and outputs. Realistically, it is very unusual that a typical project manager will have experience with most of those processes, let alone have a sound understanding of the various tools and techniques. As such, it can be intimidating to learn all of these details and the vocabulary. The “other relevant sources” are not identified by the Project Management Institute (PMI), so there is an inherent level of ambiguity in fully and adequately preparing for the test. 

The next factor contributing to the difficulty is the questions themselves. The vast majority of the questions on the PMP exam are scenario-based or application questions. You will find that many of those questions will ask, “What is the first thing you do,” “What is the next thing you do,” or “What is the best action to take?” So even if you have a strong knowledge of the processes and the inputs, tools and techniques, and outputs, the questions will want to validate the appropriate sequencing and application of those processes. Typically, you will find that there will be one incorrect answer, one answer that is not entirely right, and two that may both seem correct. You’ll have to choose the best right answer. 

Perhaps the most challenging aspect of the exam is that you will need to answer the questions from the PMI perspective, not based on your own experience. Likely, you may fundamentally disagree with the correct answer to some questions. However, to be successful on this exam, you must answer in alignment with the PMI approach. It has been said that the more experienced project managers find the exam more difficult than those who just barely meet the experience requirements. As a seasoned project manager, you may have developed your own approach and best practices, which may or may not align exactly with PMI. You will need to challenge yourself to answer in alignment with PMI instead of your own point of view. 

Finally, the wording of the questions themselves also proves challenging. The majority of the questions and even the answers will likely be very wordy. Working your way through these particular questions can cause anxiety, especially considering that you only have about one minute and 20 seconds per question. Leaving these long or confusing questions to the end of your exam is often helpful. 

How difficult is PMP Exam and Certification

There is absolutely no doubt that the PMP application and exam are notoriously difficult. However, with the proper preparation and leveraging the right tools, you can and will be successful. Create a strong study plan with the appropriate coursework and mentoring, use mock exams, and have an excellent “dump sheet” of memorized formulas to increase your chances of success. 

If you are interested in becoming a certified PMP, EduMind can help you prepare for and pass your exam. With various course learning format options to choose from, you can find the one that works best for you. Click here to find out more. 

Project Management Professional (PMP)®, A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide), “PMP,” and “PMBOK” are registered trademarks of Project Management Institute, Inc.

EduMind Inc at 01:37

Tuesday, 19 May 2020


The PMP exam is notoriously difficult, but there are some strategies you can employ to increase your chances of passing on the first attempt. While there is no shortcut on the road to PMP success, here are the top ten strategies to pass your exam! 

Tip #1: Commit to a Date – If you put off your exam until you are 100% confident, you might never take it. Your brain and behavior will perform better when you have a set date that you are working toward. 
 
Commit to a Date

Tip #2: Take Practice Tests – Merely reading books, blogs, and other materials will only get you so far in your preparation. You must practice by taking mock exams to help you identify any gaps and deficiencies. This includes an evaluation of your timing, your knowledge of the material, and your test-taking capabilities. 

Take Practice Tests

Tip #3: Understand Versus Memorize – You may have heard that memorization is the key to passing any exam. However, memorization is not enough, especially on the scenario-based questions. Instead of memorizing, work to truly understand the concepts, tools, and techniques and how and when they are applied. 

Understand vs Memorize

Tip #4: Master Your Dump Sheet – When your exam clock starts, you can jot down what is referred to as a dump sheet, which should include all of the earned value, forecasting, and estimating formulas you have memorized in preparation for the exam. Be careful not to make the dump sheet too extensive because it could eat into your allocated exam time. 

Master Your Dump Sheet

Tip #5: Get a Good Night’s Sleep – Do not underestimate the importance of getting a good night’s sleep before your exam. This is not the time to pull an all-nighter! Lack of sleep has a significant detrimental impact on your logical processing, and you’ll need all the brainpower you can get. 

Get Good Night's Sleep

Tip #6: Stay Hydrated – Given that your exam clock keeps ticking even when you use the restroom, you may be tempted to skip getting a drink of water as well. But don’t! Being fully hydrated increases the flow of information within your brain, improves recollection, and increases attention. Keep in mind that your brain is made up of more water than your body, so by the time you feel thirsty, your brain is already dehydrated! 

Stay Hydrated

Tip #7: Know Your Circadian Rhythm – All creatures have natural circadian rhythms, which are physical, mental, and behavioral changes that follow a daily cycle. It is essential to work with your body and not against it for your exam. Recognize what time of day you are at your peak analytically. If you are a morning person, schedule your exam for an early slot. Night owl? Look for a late-afternoon exam time. 

Know Your Circadian Rhythm

Tip #8: Eat Well – Nourish your body, nourish your brain! Choose your meals wisely the day before and the day of your exam to give yourself the proper nutrients and stamina to power through this four-hour exam. Remember, this is a marathon exam, not a sprint! You don’t want to crash halfway through. 

Eat Well

Tip #9: Arrive Early – The Pearson Vue exam centers reserve their computer terminals based on the length of your exam. If you are late, you will likely be asked to reschedule your exam, costing you money and time. Plan to arrive early and minimize the potential for traffic or other unforeseen delays. This will enable you to enter as relaxed as possible. Use the extra time to visit the restroom, review some notes, and maybe have a quick, healthy snack. 

Arrive Early

Tip #10: Dress Comfortably – Dress in something that will keep you comfortable for four hours in a test room. You will not be allowed to take any type of sweater or jacket off and on during your exam, so it is best to wear something light with long sleeves that can be pushed up if you get warm or pushed down if you get chilly. 

Dress Comfortably

When you are ready to take the PMP exam, EduMind can help you prepare for and pass it with confidence. With various course learning format options to choose from, you can find the one that works best for you. Click here to find out more. 

Project Management Professional (PMP)® is a registered trademark of Project Management Institute, Inc.

EduMind Inc at 08:54

Tuesday, 05 May 2020


Belinda S. Goodrich, PMP, PgMP, PMI-SP, PMI-RMP, PMI-ACP, CAPM 

If you’re an experienced, professional project manager, you may qualify to earn your PMP certification. You will need to meet both project management experience and project management education requirements in order to take the exam. Keep in mind that you do not have to hold a formal project manager title. You do, however, have to be in a position of responsibility for leading and directing project activities or a subset of project activities. 

A project with a unique outcome is considered a temporary initiative. Eligible projects are those conducted within a professional setting for which you were compensated. In other words, personal and volunteer projects would not be applicable. 

Depending on your achieved college education, there are two sets of PMP certification requirements. If you hold a four-year degree or higher, you will need three years of experience (4,500 hours) leading and directing project activities in addition to 35 hours of project management education or a Certified Associate in Project Management (CAPM®) certification. Without a four-year degree, the experience requirement increases to five years (7,500 hours) leading and directing projects along with the 35 hours of education or CAPM. 

Your experience must be within the last eight years and does not need to be sequential. Although you may work overtime on your projects, Project Management Institute (PMI) will allow you to claim no more than 40 hours per week toward the eligibility requirement. Your projects must not only span the calendar months required (36 or 60) but also provide you with the requisite number of hours. 

For example, if you managed two projects full time from January to December 2019 and split your time equally between them, you would be eligible to claim approximately 1,000 hours for each project (or 2,000 hours). However, you would only be eligible to claim 12 months of experience, as the two projects were happening concurrently. 

In documenting your project management experience, you will need to demonstrate that you have work hours in each of the project management domains of initiating, planning, executing, monitoring and controlling, and closing. Although you do not need hours in all domains for every project, you must cumulatively show that you have had hours across them all. For example, if you are submitting a project that is currently in process, you may have no hours in the closing domain, so you would need closing hours on another project. 

Unlike your project management experience, there is no eligibility window for project management education, other than that it must be completed before submitting your application. Your project management education may be one class or a combination of courses on any project management topic. If you have your CAPM, you will not need to provide proof of education. 

Upon submitting your PMP application, PMI will do a review to ensure that the experience and education you have claimed meet their criteria. This process typically takes about five calendar days. Some applications are selected for audit. To successfully and easily navigate the audit process, ensure that all information you have provided can be verified. 

PMP Certification Requirements

Once PMI approves your application, you will be instructed to pay your exam fees. PMI will then provide you with an eligibility ID, which is required to schedule your exam at a Pearson VUE location. Your eligibility year begins on the date your application is approved by PMI. The final requirement to achieving your PMP certification is passing the 200-question exam, which must be completed within your eligibility year. To maintain your PMP, you must submit 60 hours of education (professional development units) every three years. 

If you are interested in PMP certification, EduMind can help you prepare for and pass your exam with confidence. With various course learning format options to choose from, you can find the one that works best for you. Click here to find out more. 

Project Management Professional (PMP)® and Certified Associate in Project Management (CAPM)® are registered trademarks of Project Management Institute, Inc. 

EduMind Inc at 09:03

Tuesday, 21 April 2020


During these uncertain times, it is important to make sure that you clearly communicate with your clients. This is especially true when the client puts a project on hold. There are several assumptions the client could be making when they put a project on hold, and it can be critical to your firm’s operations that the client has all the facts. 

This is especially true when it comes to accounts receivable. The client may be assuming that since the project was put on hold, they won’t be seeing any invoices until the project restarts. That is most likely an incorrect assumption, and something you’ll want to proactively correct. Most firms issue invoices every 30 days and allow the client another 30 days to pay without accruing interest for late payment. This means that at the time a client puts a project on hold, they could be just about to get one of two invoices. This compounds if the client is on a longer payment cycle such as 60 days. The best approach to take is at the time the client puts the project on hold, coordinate with your accounting team, and make sure to inform the client of how many invoices they can expect, (and provide an approximate amount). Taking this step will eliminate any confusion about invoices during the project hold. 

In addition, it is a good practice to inform your client that there will be additional efforts involved in properly putting the project on hold for a while. The original scope of the project likely assumed a progressive flow to developing the design and construction documents, and stopping the project suddenly was not anticipated. You should encourage the client to consider that it will take some effort to wrap up elements of the project that are in midstream and to close it down in a way that facilitates a smoother project restart. These efforts and the related fees are normally outside the scope of work identified in the contract, and the architect is entitled to be compensated for them. Having this discussion at the time the project is put on hold will have better results for all involved. 

Projects on Hold During the COVID-19 Pandemic

Another subject to discuss with the client is what to expect at project restart. Architectural projects are very complex, and it’s not practical to expect that a project can be simply activated without some challenges. For one, there is the issue of staff availability. Can you get the same staff on your team that you had when the project was put on hold? Will you have to bring new team members up to speed? What about the project schedule? When states relax the stay-at-home orders and people begin to return to work, will there be new conditions in the workplace that present challenges to staffing your project? You might not know the answers to these questions now, but it’s best to have an open dialog with the client as the project is being put on hold to addresses the possible challenges to project restart, most of which will likely impact the schedule. 

In the end, best practices related to project management require a strong emphasis on clear communication with your client, especially in these uncertain times. Doing so could greatly improve your firm’s ability to resume normal operations and to thrive in the future.

EduMind Inc at 06:50

Tuesday, 07 April 2020


A client comes to an architect with a project. During the process, the client agrees to the design and budget and signs a contract with the contractor for a stipulated sum. While under construction, the client says they are unable to afford the project and reduces scope. What is the team supposed to do? 

Unfortunately, this is a bit of a gray area and a very tricky situation. At the time of construction, the contract between the owner and contractor is based on a stipulated sum—that which is set by the cost of work issued via the schedule of values. That is the basis for their contract and, if the architect’s fees are a percentage of cost of construction, that serves as the basis for the architect’s fees as well. 

It is the right of the contractor to request that the owner provides proof that they can financially support the cost of the project; however, that often does not happen on smaller projects. 

There are instances when the client, after the contract is signed, says they want to reduce scope—not only to lower construction costs but often to avoid architect’s fees as well. I wish this was the exception in the industry, but I have seen it time and time again. What to do? 

First and foremost, this is considered a breach of contract, as it should be. The client has not only committed to a contractual cost via the bidding and negotiation phase but has committed to a scope of work. Contracts aside, an architect has set aside time and could be missing out on potential work due to the commitment to this project. Should a project not live up to its promise (or contractual duties), the risk reaches further into the architecture firm, allocating additional resources (money) to cover work being performed, etc. The AIA contracts provide verbiage concerning the termination of the contract, but that is just that—the contract termination, which the client can do for no apparent reason. 

Project Management - Client Reduction of Scope

If the client does not terminate the contract, they are obligated to adhere to the agreed-upon conditions. They essentially have two options: to stay the course and fulfill their contractual duties, or to terminate the contract. In terminating the contract, they may very well end up with an unfinished project and increased costs due to restarting the work after it has been stopped. It may be in their best interest, then, to continue with the project and stay on track. The unfortunate part of contracts is that the architect and contractor can only terminate the contract if the client does not pay within due notice. They are not allowed recourse in this situation, whereas the client can terminate the work at any time for any reason. 

Should this happen, it is best to educate the client on the issues that arise from reducing scope and fees, as they may be unaware as to how it affects an architect’s business.

EduMind Inc at 08:40

Tuesday, 24 March 2020


A building project has undergone a substantial design process; however, when it comes to the bidding and negotiation phase, it is discovered that the project is grossly over budget. Uh oh. First of all, contractually, it is the architect’s responsibility to keep track of costs with each phase. During schematic design, these costs may be square footage or unit costs, which are very general. Design development adds more detail and costs may be associated with the quantity of square feet for specific materials or assembly costs—the cost of a certain assembly per linear foot. 

The bidding and negotiating phase is when a prospective contractor assigns actual costs to compile the cost of work. This is the most accurate cost for the work; however, the architect should always track costs throughout the process. 

So, the costs come in grossly over budget. What to do? It is the responsibility of the architect to be mindful of budget. The architect can solicit the owner for additional funding, or else they turn to value engineering. Value engineering often has a negative connotation because it is commonly associated with replacing a material or system with an often-inferior material or system due to cost. However, that is not how value engineering should be perceived. 

Value engineering is a concept in which, by definition, a substitution occurs embodying a relationship to the value of function and cost. Although part of the equation with value engineering is to provide a substitution at a lower cost, that cost cannot and should not compromise the function of the material or system to be substituted. 

A poor model of value engineering would be the example of replacing a wall system in an acoustically sensitive area. Should a particular wall assembly be replaced with one that is substantially less expensive but does not manage acoustics as well as the original proposed assembly, the assembly sacrifices functionality, which can greatly affect the use of the space. This is not conducive to the original intent and can require extra, future costs to remedy the inefficiency. 

A good model of value engineering would seek solutions to balance cost, value, and function. Value is somewhat hard to define as it contains varying objectives but, most often, it connects cost and function. For example, the value, which could attach an extra cost, is necessary due to the function it provides for that extra cost. In that case, it may not be best to value engineer that assembly out of the project. An element that may not have such a weight on function and be more aesthetic is a good place to start with value engineering. Costly marble may be substituted with a less costly engineered stone. 

Whatever the change, the process necessitates that the contractor provides substitutions for approval by the architect. The contractor cannot perform the value engineering as it is the responsibility of the architect to confirm—and subsequently approve—the appropriateness of the substitution, which should be value based, not strictly based on cost.

EduMind Inc at 06:21

Friday, 20 March 2020


Per AIA contracts , there is a lot of verbiage regarding damages. Often, all parties agree to the waiver of claims due to damages in the AIA contract A201, the general conditions of the contract for construction. 

The waiver of claims means that all parties bound together by this contract agree to hold the other parties harmless should damages be claimed. This is done for many reasons, but let’s first look at the matter of definition. 

First, what is a claim and what makes it direct or consequential? A claim is a formal request to a surety (an insurance company) to be compensated for damages. A direct damage is one that can be directly connected to damage. A common example is that of a roof that has caved in. This would assume that the roof was newly constructed and has failed due to the incompetence of the design. A claim for direct damages would request that the roof be rebuilt if it is found that there was negligence in the design of the roof. Consequential damage is damage that is a theoretical or disconnected effect due to the failure of the roof. An example of consequential damage would be the loss of rent due to the roof failure and the loss of rent to come due to its repair. The cost of rent is not directly connected to the roof damage and is, therefore, consequential—a result of the consequence. It should be noted that contract breaches could be considered consequential damages but, in court, the definition is wide and varied, and often consequential damages are limited to those defined as a result of a loss or consequence. 

As noted, in the AIA’s A201 contract, these are waived among parties. One reason could be that, with consequential damages, especially, they could be ill defined and could lead to contentious relationships within the contract. However, the contract should anticipate the worst and set up for the best—the best way to deal with unknowns and with contingencies to cover costs should something happen that leads to delays and added costs, etc. Building projects carry risks, and those risks should be managed by all parties. A contract based on rosy situations that does not anticipate issues can be problematic. 

However, a main reason for waiving claims for damages is due to business. A construction company or an architecture firm often does not have the assets of wealthy clients or development companies. Bringing claims such as these could bankrupt construction companies and architecture firms. At the very least, the damages could far exceed the profit for the particular project. It is for this reason that many companies will not work with an owner who suggests striking that waiver from the contract. 

Practice Management

How to deal with these situations? Coming up with alternative methodologies for covering such issues, other than a striking of the waiver, is what is best in these situations. However, this is often covered by professional liability insurance. No matter what, changes to the contract need to be reviewed by lawyers experienced in the construction process so that everyone is mutually covered in these agreements.

EduMind Inc at 03:28

Friday, 13 March 2020


It is often said that billing and fees for architectural services are nothing short of an art form. It is a balance between the work to be performed, fair compensation, and the satisfaction of the client. Whatever the outcome, the fees set by the architecture firm should be measured against recordkeeping but also must acknowledge that an architecture firm is also a business and needs to be viable as such. 

That viability includes maintaining a profit with every job. No matter the fee structure—hourly, percentage of construction cost, and so on—there should be an added profit calculated into the fee. If you look at a fee schedule, there is a billable rate that is much higher than what actually appears on a paycheck. For example, a project manager may earn an annual salary of $83,200, which equates to an hourly wage of $40/hour. However, the fee schedule for the firm may charge the client $120/hour for their services. Why? Should they feel cheated that they are not getting full compensation for work? 

Businesses should charge more for the hourly services of their employees—in fact, an architecture firm on average charges about three times as much. Doing so ensures that the business can pay its bills and then some. Concepts like the break-even rate and overhead rate, as well as an additional percentage for profit, all play into setting the fees for a firm. 

Before these fees can be calculated, the expenses of the firm must be determined. These are the indirect expenses—expenses that cannot be billed directly to a job/client—and include utilities, software, rent, insurance, etc. These numbers determine many things for a firm. Are there too many expenses? Are the indirect expenses benefitting the firm? These are matters of everyday business. On top of that, overhead rate is a factor to give the break-even rate. However, that does not account for profit. A typical business—and an architecture firm should be no different—aims for a 20% profit. This is also added to the hourly rate to ensure that the firm is making a profit off of every hour of wage. 

Project Management - Billing and Fees

Profit is not a bad thing, and I have known many architects who sell themselves short thinking that they are being greedy trying to make a 20% profit or any profit! But it’s business. Profit is needed to keep a firm alive, and that is actually for the benefit of the client. If a firm cannot stay viable, that may actually affect the client because if a firm folds and closes due to mismanaged finances, it could have very bad effects for the client, the job, and everyone involved (which I have also seen). It is with this mindset that projects should have a healthy financial base to maintain the growth of the firm and to ensure the success of a project.

EduMind Inc at 07:53

Tuesday, 11 February 2020


One of the most frustrating parts of a construction project can be change orders. They have given a building project a bad reputation but oftentimes, they are inevitable. Things change. This can be due to field conditions and uncovering something unexpected, or it can be due to a design change per to a client or the architect. Rather than not accept any changes whatsoever (which is, more often than not, unrealistic), changes are accounted for and built into the process. In architects’ contracts, contingencies are often included to cover design changes should they arise. Contingencies may also be included in construction contracts to cover construction costs associated with changes. In documentation, changes are handled using three different methods to formally change the contract for construction/contract documents: 

1.An architect’s supplemental instruction (ASI) 
2.(Formal) change orders 
3.Construction change directive 

Any change will have a connection to cost, schedule, and scope. 

If there is no change in cost, schedule, or scope, then an ASI is issued (AIA document G710-2017 or a version thereof). It is only to be used for minor changes and oftentimes serves to provide clarification. 

If there is a change in cost, schedule, or scope, a change can be handled in two ways: through a formal change order or a construction change directive. Despite being treated as two separate entities, they are essentially two different ways of getting to the same place—authorizing a change through a formal change order. To clarify that point, the end goal is to have the change approved and work performed and compensated. A formal change order (AIA document G701-2017) is straightforward. It lists the change in scope and the time and/or costs associated with the change. It is an agreement between the owner, architect, and contractor that is signed by all parties. When it has been signed, the work is done and compensated to cover the extra costs (and may be covered by the contingencies added to contracts). 

However, sometimes this process does not run so smoothly. Sometimes a contractor may issue a change order for approval, but the owner does not agree with the cost or time. Any disagreement could delay the project further. The contractor could be liable for any change in schedule or projection completion could be delayed. This is the role of the construction change directive (G714-2017), which directs the changes to be made while the terms (cost and time) are being hammered out. This is an efficient way of performing the work and keeping the project on schedule, even in a time of conflict and discord. It is recommended that the construction change directive, when approved, is superseded by a formal change order, which is why they are two ways of getting to the ultimate goal: an approved change order. 

These documents not only track the changes in the work (possibly with an accompanying log) but are the three ways to formally change the contract for construction.

EduMind Inc at 13:00

Tuesday, 14 January 2020


Budgeting and contracts are nothing short of an artform when applying them to the practice of architecture. They are always trying to hit a moving target—you never know what the outcome will be. 

With budgets, the moving target is the work needed to perform the services and allocating them in order to make a profit. In the following example, we are looking at the budgets for an architectural firm’s services. 

Top-Down Budget

Referencing the example above, top-down budgets start with the estimated cost of construction and the allocation of the architect’s fee from a percentage of estimated construction costs (note that this assumes that the architect’s contract is based on a percentage of construction costs for their service fee). That gross fee then subtracts the consultant’s fees (per the B101-2017 contract, the architect’s services includes consultants: structural, mechanical, and electrical engineers) in order to produce a net service revenue. The net service revenue is the monies that should be allocated for the architect’s services. However, the direct expense budget and the contingency budget should also be considered. Direct expenses are billable to a specific project and should be set aside as there are always direct expenses for a project. Contingencies cover any expenses should there be design changes. Top-down budgets set aside a direct expense budget and a contingency budget to cover unexpected expenses as a safeguard, so they don’t come out of the service revenue—the monies needed for the actual services of the contract to be performed. If they are not used, they are considered profit. Those expense budgets subtracted from the net service revenue results in the project labor budget, which is then broken down per phase and service percentages (e.g., 5% may go to bidding and negotiation because that is the typical percentage breakdown of that service phase). 

With bottom-up budgeting, services are broken out by how long the architect thinks it will take to perform the service per phase multiplied by an average service fee. A bottom-up budget is much more organic and relies on experience to be able to allocate the time per service. 

What is important to remember is that, again, this is trying to hit a moving target. How do you know which method is right when, compared side by side, they can have a huge difference? What’s important is to recognize that difference in going through the exercise. It should be common practice to work with both budgets side by side and if differences are way off, more time may need to be added/ subtracted per phase (bottom-up) or a different percentage may be allocated (top-down). The point is to see if the budgets meet in the middle and how. However, it is also important to review this along with other business expenses to ensure that compensation is not only fair but attributes to the health of the business practice in other areas (covering benefits, payroll, overhead, etc.).

EduMind Inc at 07:04

Thursday, 15 November 2018


There are many benefits to becoming a certified Project Management Professional (PMP®). However, the process of becoming certified can be stressful. In order to manage the stresses of taking the PMP exam, project managers should adhere to the following PMP exam tips: 

Review Information About the Exam 

Project Management Institute (PMI®) offers several resources to help project managers prepare for the PMP exam. The current PMP exam content outline explains the percentage of questions on the exam from each domain. Reviewing the outline will help you understand where you should focus your efforts when studying. The PMP Handbook includes information about applying to take the exam, exam policies and procedures, and certification policies and procedures. Learning as much as you can about the PMP exam and what to expect on exam day will help ease some stress the morning of the exam.

Study the PMBOK® Guide

A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK Guide) is an important resource for preparing for the PMP exam. The PMP exam was updated in the beginning of 2018 to align with the release of the sixth edition of the PMBOK Guide. Be sure to familiarize yourself with the project management concepts that are discussed in the PMBOK Guide and have this resource available as you are preparing for the exam.

Take Practice Exams

Knowing the types of questions that will appear on the PMP exam and being familiar with the format of the exam will help you to be better prepared and feel more confident when you are taking the actual exam. PMI provides PMP sample test questions. You can also find practice questions and exam simulators as part of select PMP prep courses

Enroll in a PMP Prep Course

If you feel stressed about preparing on your own, you can sign up for an online PMP exam prep course. A good exam prep course should include lecture notes and PMP practice exam questions. Another benefit of taking a course is that it can count toward the 35 contact hours of formal project management education prerequisite, which PMI requires for PMP eligibility. 

By knowing what to expect on exam day, reviewing the important concepts that will appear on the exam, practicing sample exam questions, and preparing for the exam with a prep course, you should feel confident about taking and passing the PMP exam. 


EduMind Inc at 23:18

Friday, 09 November 2018


Becoming a certified Project Management Professional (PMP®) is not an easy task. Doing so requires thousands of hours of leading and directing projects and passing a difficult exam. However, the benefits of PMP certification far exceed the effort required to become a PMP. 

According to Project Management Institute (PMI®), the PMP “is the most important industry-recognized certification for project managers.”i It is not a simple task to earn this industry-recognized certification. In order to even sit for the PMP exam, project managers must meet certain criteria. The application process requires information about education attained and project management experience. In fact, project managers with a four-year degree need 4,500 hours of leading and directing projects while project managers with a secondary degree must have accrued 7,500 hours of leading and directing projects. By completing the PMP exam application, being approved to take the exam, and passing the exam, PMP-certified project managers set themselves apart. Being a PMP shows that project managers have the necessary knowledge and experience to effectively manage projects. 

Not only does obtaining PMP certification prove project management experience but preparing for the PMP exam provides project managers with additional project management knowledge. Project management professionals who are applying to take the PMP exam must have 35 hours of project management education. This education is critical for passing the PMP exam, but it can also be applied in the workplace and can increase a project manager’s skillset. 

A higher salary is another benefit of PMP certification. In a survey of nearly 11,000 project management professionals in the United States, PMP holders had a median salary that was 25% higher than the median salary of project management professionals who were not PMP certified. The median salary for PMP holders was $115,000 compared to $92,000 for non-PMP project management professionals.ii

Whether a project management professional is seeking a way to stand out in the industry, is wanting to learn new project management knowledge and skills, or is looking to make more money, becoming a PMP can help achieve these goals. Start applying to take and preparing for the PMP exam to gain the benefits of PMP certification. 

References

iProject Management Professional (PMP). Retrieved from 

iiProject Management Salary Survey (2018). Retrieved from 


EduMind Inc at 00:49

Friday, 20 October 2017


Introduction

A project management office (PMO) can be broadly defined as a management structure that standardizes project-related tasks within an organization. A PMO facilitates the sharing of resources, methodologies, tools, and techniques among the projects under their guidance or control. For those who are preparing for the CAPM® exam, an understanding of the need for, formation of, and duties of a PMO is essential. 


Duties of a PMO 

Some of the duties and responsibilities of PMOs include the following: 
  • Set standards for how projects are run
  • Ensure project management standards are followed
  • Gather project data 
  • Produce required information for management review
  • Guide and advise project managers
  • Manage and facilitate the portfolio management process
PMO Roles

· Supportive: These PMOs play a consultative role to projects and assist the project managers by providing templates, updated best practices of project management, training as per requirements, access to available information, and lessons learned from earlier or similar projects. The degree of power and control for these PMOs is considered low. When a PMO’s power is low, project managers have full power to manage projects. 

· Controlling: The PMOs under this category, apart from providing support to projects as is done in in the supportive role, also seek compliance from project managers on the templates, methodologies, tools, and techniques provided to them. This form of PMO has a little more power than supportive PMOs and can be categorized as having moderate power. In this category, the project manager also has moderate power. 

· Directive: Directive PMOs have complete control of the projects, which includes organizing and managing the projects. In this role, the PMO acts as a direct liaison for the organization's portfolios, programs, and projects. In this category, the project managers have little or no power in decision making. The importance of a directive PMO is thoroughly discussed in our CAPM exam review course.

Need for a PMO

The parameters involved in the project management function include people, technology, communication, and resources. Unless these functions are governed judiciously, the project management function by senior management can be risky, and therefore, the use of a PMO can be beneficial. Our CAPM exam review course fully recaps the importance of and functions of a PMO.



EduMind Inc at 05:13

Wednesday, 01 March 2017


Project management is classified as a set of techniques, tools, and skills that are applied to achieve a specific project goal. Every project is under a time constraint, regardless of the size. If the speculated time for the project lapses before the project is complete, the purpose of the project is defeated. Since every project is on a deadline, it is important to be extremely conscious of time to effectively complete the project.

One on One PMP Tutoring
One on One PMP Tutoring

Why is Time Management Important to Project Management?

Time management is the deliberate act of knowing, tracking, and keeping time. The importance of
time management cannot be overemphasized. When the true value of time is recognized, it immensely helps with the proper allocation of tasks to be completed for a project.

Here’s how time management can guarantee a smooth workflow:

1. Helps in the setting of priorities
2. Ensures that careful, deliberate steps are taken towards achieving a set of goals
3. Reduces wasting time and energy and leads to more productivity
4. Assists individuals pay close attention to deadlines

Despite being the most important aspect of project management, time management is often neglected. Individuals tend to pay more attention to the deadline of a project rather than proper allocation of time. Overlooking any part of a project can have overall detrimental effects. Proper time management ensures that project is not just completed, but that it is successfully completed.

Things to Consider for Effective Time Management

Enrolling for a PMP review course or One-on-One PMP tutoring sessions will teach multiple methods to effectively manage time in a project.  Following are tips for proper time management:

1. Decide what goals are to be achieved.
2. A list of tasks should be created after goal determination. The important and most pressing requirements should be highlighted on the list.
3. Measures should be taken to ensure that the highlighted tasks are performed first.
4. Consistent monitoring must be undertaken to ensure that all tasks are performed in accordance with the planned schedule.

If one wishes to enhance their project management skills, One-on-One PMP tutoring can be of great tool for learning the ropes of effective time management.

EduMind Inc at 02:30

Friday, 17 February 2017


As global demand for project managers continues to grow at a rampant pace, it is essential for a candidate to know the industries that are offering the best options for project managers.

We have compiled a list of 5 high-paying industries that are growing in their project management job opportunities.

Onsite PMP Training
Onsite PMP Training


AEROSPACE & DEFENSE

Aerospace manufacturing hubs across the globe are increasingly embracing project management business processes to achieve project goals. Project managers are in high demand and are required to:
Identify key tasks
Devise strategic goals 
Monitor progress to achieve milestones

With complex and stringent regulations followed in the aerospace industry, a qualified project manager is a necessity. 

ENGINEERING

In the engineering industry, more than 75% of projects have schedule overruns, 55% have budget overruns and 37% fail to meet the goals. The primary reason attributed to these pitfalls is a short supply of project managers with professional training and experience. Project managers who are PMP certified can revive the industry by adding professional experience to projects.  

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

Project management as a discipline has seen rapid growth and development in information technology. In fact, major IT corporations are now providing PMP onsite bootcamp training in order to help retain their employees and meet the increasing need for project managers. The need for qualified project managers has increased by 20% in recent years in the IT industry. 

FINANCE

Project managers with risk identification and management skills are in high demand. From handling mergers and acquisitions to monitoring stock underwritings, project managers will become key decision makers in banking, financial services and insurance. 

HEALTHCARE

The healthcare market is growing at a steady pace of 10-15% and is becoming one of the major sources of project management activity. 

MEDIAN SALARY


The median salary of these industries is depicted  below.




All of these stats and discussions lead to one conclusion: Aerospace, Engineering, IT, Finance and Healthcare industries are set for  growth, which project managers can tap into for fulfilling employment. 



EduMind Inc at 07:09

Monday, 06 February 2017


While we bring forth the most common answers, to the most important questions, your PMP coach has better
Knowledge about every individual’s strengths and weaknesses and can offer precise solutions.

How can I handle the long scenario-based questions in the PMP exam?

Read the last sentence first as often times that are enough to answer the question and you avoid the fluff and distractions.  Incorporate these strategies while preparing for the PMP® exam.



How can I best manage my time during the actual exam?
• Put an answer for every questions
• Answer the easy questions first, marking the more difficult questions for review
• Mark the questions that need to be reviewed at the end of the exam.

Discuss the following with your PMP coach to learn other ways to be successful on the PMP® exam.

How can I effectively cover the entire course content with a plan?
• Reading and obtaining information through a study guide
• Audio or visual aids or classes through media players
• Group study with other students or instructors in person or online
• Mentor or coaching institute through regular classes or online sessions

How many times should I take practice tests and what scores should I aim for?

Track your progress by recording your score on each practice test your PMP coach to track progress through every test and to assess the quality of mock tests.

PMP exam prep requires a lot of time and effort to achieve the desired results. A PMP coach plays a significant role in preparing the student to take on the challenge.


EduMind Inc at 23:47

Wednesday, 04 January 2017


In the corporate world, growth is the only constant. Organizations are continually working towards developing their skill set to match the dynamic demands of the business landscape.
 As a part of the initiatives taken towards the growth of employees, several corporate companies are now offering the exclusive corporate PMP onlinetraining course to their workforce. The online course leverages the ubiquity of Internet to cross all geographical boundaries and unite employees through world-class training.
Here is a set of easy tips that can help crack the PMP corporate training.

Corporate PMP Training
Corporate PMP Training

Start with the right and relevant information
In order to ace the PMP exam, one must gather sufficient information regarding the subjects to be covered, time demands of the course, the fees involved, the scope of the exam in their relevant field of work and finally evaluate how appearing for the PMP exam can elevate their career. No matter how experienced an individual is, PMP prep is important and one must be willing to dedicate sufficient time and effort to clear the exam.

Choose the right training center for the PMP course
Not all training centers offering corporate PMP online training course are made the same. Therefore the first step would be to figure out which center to choose. Check for some important factors like reputation of the center, experience in the industry and competency of instructors. The chosen center must be able to tailor the schedule of the course and perfectly match it with the organization’s needs.  

Balance out the time appropriately
Once you have enrolled for an online course, plan your schedule to accommodate your work responsibilities, personal commitments, PMP preparation and practice sessions. Ensure you have well-defined time slots for each activity and without overlaps. The online course will cut out the need to travel to faraway places for PMP prep and students can use this time to engage in further intense learning.

Take up sufficient number of practice sessions
Practice sessions of PMP help to familiarize with the kind of questions, the approach to be applied for each type and the time required in resolving them. Practice sessions boost the confidence level of the students and make the PMP platform a much known place to work with.

Ask questions to your trainer
Reputed training centers that offer corporate PMP online training course are home to a team of skilled trainers who can help catalyze one’s PMP preparation. Talk to the trainer to have all queries addressed then and there. Learn a tip or two about time management, efficient preparation and subject-based topics too.
PMP can be a game changing move in one’s career. With these simple yet effective steps in place, cracking the exam can be easier and efficient.



EduMind Inc at 01:35

Friday, 16 December 2016


Risk Management is an important aspect of project management and a professional credential in this specific area arms an individual with all the abilities to cope diversity, complexity and global challenges.
RMP Exam
RMP exam

A project cycle encompasses different phases and each of them require proper planning to handle risks and uncertainties. With dynamic industrial changes it has become essential for an organization to engage a professional who has expertise in recognizing threats, mitigating risks and planning possible solutions. The role of a risk manager is integral to the completion of each phase and plays an important part in meeting objectives of the project.

The PMI-RMP exam reflects accurately the practices of the project risk management professionals. Preparation for this examination offers the practitioner deep insight into industrial practices and standards and provide access to important resources.

Here are few things that a PMI-RMP pursuant should know while preparing for the exam:

PMI-RMP exam process: Before beginning the preparation for the examination it is important to understand the process developed by PMI specifically for this exam. The process uses knowledge and task-driven guidelines to assess competence of a practitioner and determines the level of salience, criticality and frequency of knowledge, tasks and skills required to be a project-risk manager. The process has been designed according to best practices of test development and based upon inputs from practitioners who establish those standards. All questions are written and reviewed by qualified PMI-RMP credential holders. 

RMP Exam

Process of Exam 

Five Important Domains: The PMI-RMP exam is focused on five key domains and tasks related to each domain appear on the multiple-choice format examination. Thorough practice and extensive knowledge of each domain becomes crucial for candidates to pass the exam. Study of five domains, namely, Risk and Strategy Planning, Stakeholder Engagement, Risk Process Facilitation, Risk Monitoring and Reporting, and Perform Specialized Risk Activities, provides knowledge about specific roles associated with each domain and responsibilities that are expected to be performed within that role.

Proportion of questions: PMI has created a clear outline of the exam by concentrating specific proportion of questions from each domain. The preparation for the exam becomes easier if the candidate gains proper knowledge of the exam outline and key aspects from each domain. 



Importance of PMI-RMP preparation course: PMI requires the candidate to have project risk management education of total 30-hours (if you have a bachelor’s degree) or 40-hours (if you have a secondary degree). This could be met either with a project risk management course or with a PMI-RMP preparation course.

Study Resources: The exam requires rigorous preparation and access to useful resources to pass it. The candidates need to have idea of real-world risk management situations since several questions are based on real world scenarios. Preparatory course, training programs, self-study and study groups can become extremely beneficial for the candidate. PMP exam reference books along with PMBOK Guide also provide all important information and resources.








EduMind Inc at 06:17

Thursday, 17 November 2016


Enrolling for classes to train and prepare for PMP exam is a decision that requires a little rescheduling of routine. The trick is to accomplish the same without affecting the regular course of work.
Read on to find out about the five types of people who can best benefit from PMP boot camp courses.

PMP Boot Camp Course
PMP Boot Camp course

The Travelling Professional
Working professionals are always on the move, giving presentations, meeting clients, resolving issues, visiting sites etc. This category includes managers and senior executives in charge of regional marketing, sales and new projects in software and construction. It may appear impossible to take up courses, but quite on the contrary, it is easy for this category to fit in the PMP boot camp course. With outstanding flexibility and commendable coverage, the course is specially designed for all those who have jobs that demand busy travelling schedules.

High Stress Jobs
Some jobs are highly stressful in nature, and lead to burnout or attrition. This category includes managers with very high and competitive targets in the financial markets and people from the technical field. A professional who wishes to clear the PMP exam needs to plan in such a way that the stress from the work place does not move into his/her preparations too. Such busy stressed professionals enhance their chance for a positive career change by enrolling for the PMP boot camp courses. The course covers a whole set of features like simulation practice, workshops and free question bank access to ensure that the professionals are prepared for the exam just like any other student.

Students working part time
Many students pursuing regular academic courses also take up a part time job in order to mitigate the financial burden at home. Students in this category need to manage time in a  careful manner and make both ends meet. The best way to compensate for the loss of time at work is to choose the PMP boot camp course. Students get to interact with their peers through the online medium and share experiences too. These courses are much affordable and can easily place the student on a stronger career path.

Women Resuming a Career After a Maternity Break
Mothers who are on a break from work, but wish to restart their career, may use PMP as a platform to begin the race. However balancing between preparation and the numerous responsibilities of being a new mother is never easy. In such cases, the PMP boot camp courses conducted by highly trained professionals helps them to fast track their preparation and the four weeks intense preparation enhances the chances of success too. 

Mid-Career Professionals
The time to make minor re-alignments in career is at mid-level. Included in this category are senior managers in software, financial services and construction. With sufficient experience as backup and scope to grow as a PMP, mid-level is the ideal time to opt for a PMP course. The only aspects that need to be taken care of are time and not letting present job profile influence the interpretations. Clearly the onsite PMP boot camp classes are the perfect fit to get the best of both worlds.



EduMind Inc at 02:33

Tuesday, 15 November 2016


PMI-RMP is a globally recognised credential that helps an individual become a specialist in risk management
Here are few things a PMI-RMP pursuant should know while preparing for the exam:
PMI-RMP Exam process: Before beginning the preparation for the examination it is important to understand the process developed by PMI specifically for this exam .

Five important domains: The PMI-RMP exam i focused on five key domains
  • Risk and Strategy Planning
  • Stakeholder Engagement
  • Risk Process Facilitation
  • Risk Monitoring and Reporting
  • Performing Specialised Risk Activities


PMI-RMP


Proportion of Question:

PMI has created a clear outline of the exam by concentrating specific proportion of questions from each domain

Importance of PMI-RMP Preparation Course: PMI requires the candidate to have project risk management education of total 30 - hours (if you have bachelor's degree) or 40 hours (if you have a secondary degree)

Study Resources: The exam requires rigorous preparation and access to useful resources to pass it. The candidates need to have idea of real-world risk management situations since several questions are base on real world scenarios.



EduMind Inc at 07:32

Monday, 24 October 2016


Managing an important project with no form of communication can yield disastrous results. For a project to be successful several aspects have to be taken care of such as – meticulous planning, resource utilization, decision making abilities and regular communication with team members. 
Most often, a project manager’s inability to communicate well results in the failure or several shortcomings in a project. A customized one-on-one PMP tutoring class can contribute immensely towards tackling this challenge. A PMP certified project manager at the end of the course is confident, able to communicate effectively and execute the project tasks efficiently. 

One on One PMP Tutoring
One on One PMP Tutoring
What are the advantages of effective communication?
A team that collaborates, shares ideas and makes decisions together is the strongest. Getting a highly diverse team to perform these actions is not an easy feat. A good communicator who takes up project management enjoys the following benefits,
  • Communication helps build relationships and nurtures the trust factor among peers.
  • Undemanding, easy conversations with team members make more intense conversations simpler and getting the work done from them becomes smooth and hassle-free.
  • Helps sets expectations right.
  • Communication brings consistency into the project and keeps everyone informed about changes.
  • Regular communication with team members can motivate them to be more productive.
  • Communication with stakeholders keeps them in the loop and makes them feel secure.
How can project managers enhance the communication within their team?
  • Have a solid communication plan in place.
  • Listen to your peers and you will find them communicating their needs better. 
  • Use more than one channel of communication (refer to Appendix A to learn about the different types of communication channels used within an organization)
  • For instance, when there is a new assignment, send out a formal mail explaining the requirements of the assignment, Additionally, share the excitement about the new assignment over a cup of coffee with your team members. 
  • Share project details with your shareholders whenever possible. Transparency breeds trust. 
  • Make your conversations intact and to-the-point. Convey the message appropriately and furnish details whenever necessary. 
  • Create a forum that can be used as a social platform to exchange ideas, share opinions and raise queries whenever necessary. 
  • Lastly, project managers must get the information flowing through the team always and allow no place for any guesswork. They must also keep their customers informed of all deliverables promptly.
Many individuals believe that modern project management tools and the online medium can compensate for the lack of communication skills in project managers. But remember that the ability to hold a real conversation with another individual starts right through the PMP one-on-one course training and is the base to nurturing professional relationships within an organization.


EduMind Inc at 01:28

Tuesday, 27 September 2016


Without a doubt, PMP is a challenging exam. But in order to ease the preparation phase of PMP exam, renowned training centers offer the ondemand PMP exam prep course. PMP is for anyone who wishes to make a mark in the project management field. Most often business professionals raise their doubts about the credibility of the on demand course modules and their effectiveness.
On Demand PMP Exam Prep Course
On Demand PMP Exam Prep Course
Here is a list of factors that can change one’s approach to the on demand PMP course

On demand classes are second to none
The on demand PMP exam prep course is a comprehensive package that comes with free practice tests and access to question bank. It is like any other form of training except that the lessons are all in the recorded form and can be accessed according to individual study plans

They offer the highest level of flexibility
Are you a marketing professional travelling to various places in a week? Are you a team lead who is resolving some major organizational issues? On demand PMP exam prep course is too flexible and can be fitted into the schedule of the busiest employees in an organization.

On demand courses cover all important topics
The recorded lectures are designed in such a way that all important topics for PMP are covered without fail. Professionals can therefore be confident about appearing for the exam if they have completed the on demand course successfully

 The course suitable for on the go learning too
No matter how far you travel for work and how time constrained you are, PMP on demand course help you to tuck in the learning process wherever and whenever you can. With the on demand course and hindrances lying on the pathway to grand success are removed and unprecedented career growth is assured.

On demand courses help take on the challenge with expert guidance
The recorded lectures and guidelines offered by the on demand course are from expert resources and are 100% reliable. What can be better than having experts in the field help you to prepare for one of the most rewarding exams from any location in the world?

The benefits of on demand PMP exam prep course are innumerable and professionals who have availed the course in the past have enjoyed a very percentage of success. The best way to leverage the advantages of on demand PMP exam prep course is by enrolling for the course through a trusted educational center.



EduMind Inc at 03:07

Tuesday, 06 September 2016


PMP Exam Training Online
PMP  Exam Training Online
Project management is one of the oldest business practices that has gained significant importance despite the technological advancements. Project management is more than Gantt charts, graphs and heaps of paperwork. It demands project manager to contribute intellectually, emotionally and psychologically to complete a task successfully.

In the recent years, several businesses have witnessed steep changes in the field of project management. The evolving technical tools of the trade have contributed to the changes in Project Management Profession. This evolution has become an emerging trend and project managers must be prepared to take on the challenges with a fail proof project management plan. 

Here is what the future has in store for those planning to enroll for a PMP exam training online / onsite. 


Project managers partner with business analysts to drive more value

The emerging forces of the 21st century like mobile phones, social media, digital disruption and technological advances have made project management more complex. In order to stay up-to-date with these forces, the traditional roles of the project manager and the business analyst will be redefined. The two entities will work hand in hand to drive better business value. Project managers who are willing to move from a tactical role to a more strategic function will be greatly regarded by CIOs around the world. 

There will be a clear line of demarcation between organizations that consider project management as project administration 

Some organizations will treat project managers as project administrators thereby implementing  rigid processes. These organizations will follow a top down approach on project management and rely much on the use of project management tools. On the other hand, there will be organizations that will offer more autonomy to a project manager and push him / her to take the leadership position. Such organizations will use the agile method of project management. Project managers must understand and learn the specifics of this method to outshine competition. 

Project managers must turn into cultural change agents to nurture innovation

Project managers handling innovation driven projects must understand that creativity brings change and change management becomes a business necessity. Project managers who are responsible for digitally disruptive projects or innovative projects in any field must make cultural change management as part of the project plan and play the role of the change agent too. 

Project management to re-segment by domain

The role of a project manager in a bio tech project will never be the same as that of the one in a construction project. No two domains are the same and the future will witness stronger segmentation of these domain-specific roles. Thus enrolling in an outstanding PMP exam training online to ace the exam must be accompanied by garnering sufficient domain knowledge too. 

Despite the evolving technology, project management will continue to be the realm of every business organization. Emerging project managers should adapt to the changing needs of the project to taste success. 




EduMind Inc at 05:36

Monday, 29 August 2016


What really happens inside project management? How do project managers spend their time at work? What kind of tools are used, and how are they used in project management? These are some of the questions you should consider before signing up for a PMP training course

Unlike other management areas, project management follows specific methodologies with their own defined set of standards. Each project methodology has its own way of dealing with resources and business requirements. A project manager must master these methodologies in order to deliver value to the project. 

The most commonly adopted project methodologies include Waterfall, Scrum, and Agile. Agile is becoming the most commonly used project management methodology due to its cost-effectiveness and ability to achieve project milestones using minimal resources. 

Project Management Tools and Software Frequently Used

Project management methodologies and tools/software are two different things. Many candidates signing up for PMP course mix up methodologies and software, which results in poor performance on the exam. 

Project Management Training
Project Management Training

Project managers have many project management tools at their disposal. Project management software helps project managers take stock of all available resources, assign them to specific projects, link milestones to team efforts and monitor the progress. The dashboard of project management software provides the project manager with necessary information like work reports, defects, tests, issues, and changes made. 

Project Management is More than just Managing Projects

Almost anyone can manage a project, but only very few will earn their PMI PMP® certification.  In fact, research done by Wrike found that out of 1,464 workers, 94% were actively involved in project management. However, only 47% of the workforce actually hold a valid PMP certification.  A lack of proper training and expertise in project management often costs businesses in terms of the project budget, schedule, and the ability to meet the project’s requirements. 

Project management has evolved into a domain where managers have to keep up with rapid changes. For instance, in the future, project managers will have to rely more on remote project teams. In fact, more than 40% of the workforce in an organization is estimated to be freelancers, independent contractors, or temporary employees. Project managers have to increasingly become skilled at managing a remote workforce to achieve project goals. 

Likewise, in the future, from project meetings to employee onboarding, most  project activities will take place virtually. Room meetings will decline in number as virtual conferences and digital workplaces will take precedence. 

Project management demands that a manager is able to multi-task. Project managers must be professionals who can constantly evolve and adapt to changing scenarios. Digitally equipped workplaces and staff working remotely or from remote areas are changing the conventional ways of working on a project, which is seen as an increasing trend that is likely to become the future of project management. 


EduMind Inc at 05:03

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